Asbury’s Asheville: 1900-1907

For Starters: Some Guesses as to Why Asbury Chose Asheville

Foster A. Sondley, Asheville and Buncombe County (1883). Internet Archive.

Foster A. Sondley, Asheville and Buncombe County (1883). Internet Archive.

Although the romantic designation as the Land of the Sky was bestowed upon Asheville in Christian Reid’s 1875 novel, this 1883 drawing in early historian Foster A. Sondley’s Asheville and Buncombe County (1922) shows a still small, bucolic mountain town of 2,600 people.

Seven years later, Lindsey’s Guide to Western North Carolina (one of many guide books of the period) waxed lyrical about what had recently transpired in distinctly urban Asheville:

Asheville has her streets lighted with electric light towers, one hundred and twenty-five feet high, placed at proper intervals over the city, with arc and drop lights, and night is almost turned into day.

Asheville has a street railway operated by electricity; and the tourist or visitor is met at the depot by the street cars and conveyed to any part of the city for five cents.

The city is also supplied with gas of the best quality at a very cheap rate.

A splendid system of sewerage has just been completed, and almost every house can now be accommodated with electricity, water, gas, the telephone, and sewerage. The free delivery of the mail is being established . . . . What more advantages can be had anywhere?

Asheville has a fire company and a splendid hook and ladder company.

There are now four railroads running into the city, and there is good prospect of three others.

First electric streetcar run, February 1, 1889. Pack Memorial Public Library.

First electric streetcar run, February 1889. Pack Memorial Public Library (B634-8).

As the 1887 city directory makes clear, there were still wagon makers, wheelwrights,

Asheville City Directory, 1887

Asheville City Directory, 1887

coopers, and blacksmiths in town, but the array of commercial establishments was clearly tracking the shift toward new technologies, forms, styles, and tastes.

By 1900, Asheville was in fact a burgeoning node of modernity, and its population had increased dramatically since the 1870s. The Sanborn Map Company’s map of 1901 listed it as 14,000.  Besides the infrastructural improvements Lindsey’s Guide listed, there were new upscale neighborhoods, fancy shops, daily newspapers, photographers and printers, and postcard vendors.  The grand original Battery Park Hotel had commanded the

Glen Rock Hotel (built 1889), Depot and Southside Streets. Pack Memorial Public Library

Glen Rock Hotel (built 1889), Depot and Southside Streets. Pack Memorial Public Library

heights of downtown for nearly fifteen years, and the slightly newer Glen Rock stood hundreds of feet below at river level, across from the Southern Railway depot at Depot Street and Southside Avenue.

Asheville’s growth and modernity were not the only factors attracting Asbury, however.  Other urban magnets also lay at various distances from Morganton, where so far as I have been able to determine he was (without fail probably, as we Georgia Tech engineers used to say) living and working until he decided to move to Asheville early in 1900.

Other Cities, Other Routes

Principal among the urban magnets was certainly Charlotte (incorporated 1768, nearly three decades earlier than Asheville), another node of modernism offering everything Asheville did, and much more of it, although no one had ever thought to try to sell the Queen City as a romantic “Land of the Sky.”

Asheville was only a third the size of Charlotte, but it had grown nearly 400% since 1870, and other cities among the top ten in population lay east of Winston-Salem.  So as for scaled-up modernity–recalling that by now Asbury had a seven-years-and-counting romantic attachment in Morganton–it was Asheville or Charlotte.

The downside of Charlotte (bigger or not, and by how much) was how long it took to get there and back from Morganton.  Consider the 1900 railroad map:

North Carolina Railroad Map, 1900. North Carolina Maps Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

North Carolina Railroad Map, 1900. North Carolina Maps Collection, UNC Chapel Hill. Click map for large version.

Morganton (Burke County) lies near the center; Asheville (Buncombe) is at left center; Charlotte (Mecklenburg) is toward lower right.  The red lines mark the Southern Railway; green is Seaboard Airline (running southeast toward Wilmington); yellow is SouRailwayLogo_AVLCityDir_1900“miscellaneous [rail]roads.”  As for rail accessibility, there was no contest: Asheville lay nearly straight west, from Morganton through Marion to Old Fort, then up the mountain and through the Swannanoa Tunnel to Asheville.  To Charlotte? Two options: from Morganton through Hickory to Newton, on east to Statesville, then straight south to Charlotte.  Or worse: Morganton to Newton, then a “miscellaneous” train south to Lincolnton, where you could  then board the Seaboard Airline southeast to Charlotte.

The accessibility/convenience preference for Asheville was augmented by topography.  Charlotte was a piedmont city, but Asbury and his near relatives had long lived in the foothills region, in sight of the mountains. Look at the railroad map again: the Blue Ridge range ran NE to SW, marking off McDowell and Rutherford counties from Buncombe, and the South Mountain range ran E and W on the shared borders of Burke, McDowell, Cleveland, and Rutherford, where Whisnants had lived for a century and a half. “Up on [or over behind] South Mountain” was a phrase I recall my grandfather using many a time.

That range seems to have lingered as a permanent feature of his mental geography.

Rutherford County elevations. NC Department of Transportation, via Wikipedia.

Rutherford County elevations. NC Department of Transportation, via Wikipedia.

Look briefly at one more map: The south end of the county (bordering South Carolina) lies below 900 ft.  The mountains near Buncombe (left) rise to nearly 4,000 ft., as does the South Mountain range (center top).  The high (1,500-2,500 ft.) mountains at upper right lie mostly in Golden Valley township, where Asbury’s family lived.

Asheville’s Edge in the Competition

And briefly, one possibly relevant factor (new sanitariums in Asheville) and two more likely persuasive ones for Asbury’s choice: family connections and jobs.

Asheville’s long (since at least 1800) reputation as a health resort strengthened after the Civil War (and especially after the railroad arrived in 1880).  The National Register of

Mountain Sanitarium for Pulmonary Diseases, 1870s. Documenting the American South.

Mountain Sanitarium for Pulmonary Diseases, 1870s. Documenting the American South.

Historic Places notes that The Villa was the first tuberculosis sanitarium in the entire country, and others followed quickly.  Baltimore physician Dr. William Gleitsman’s Mountain Sanitarium for Pulmonary Diseases opened in the 1870s, and pioneering Turkish tuberculosis physician Karl Von Ruck’s Winyah followed in 1888.  Fittingly, the new Journal of Tuberculosis, edited by Von Ruck, was published in Asheville.  His house is on the National Register.

In the same Asheville Citizen issue that advertised Von Ruck’s Winyah, Dr. T. J. Hargan’s Asheville Sanitarium touted the “phenomenal success” of its “Compound Oxygen” treatment that was curing “many cases that had been considered hopeless.”  And a few months later, Quisisana’s German Method Nature Cure held out hope in the form of “Swedish Movements”–but not, unfortunately to consumptives beyond “the first states.”

Asheville Daily Citizen, October 3, 1900. Newspapers.com

Asheville Daily Citizen, October 3, 1900. Newspapers.com

The growth of this new commercial sector was a possibly attractive factor for Asbury and Ella (as in fact it was slightly earlier for Asheville development moguls George W. Vanderbilt and E. W. Grove).  Having worked for a half-dozen years or so at the state hospital in Morganton, Asbury and Ella had relevant experience and expertise.  And twelve- or so square-block Morganton (see 1900 Sanborn map) itself could offer little.  Its population was under 2,000 in 1900, the majority of which consisted of patients and staff at the State Hospital, and students and staff at the  adjacent School for the Deaf and Dumb.  Its only other major employer was a large tanning company adjacent to the railroad tracks.

And what about family as a draw?  The June, 1900 Federal Census listed only forty-seven Whisnants (no other spellings checked) in North Carolina, two-thirds of whom were in the Rutherford, Cleveland and McDowell County cluster.

Whisnants in North Carolina, 1900 Census. Adapted from HeritageQuestOnline

Whisnants in North Carolina, 1900 Census. Adapted from HeritageQuestOnline

There were none in Haywood County, to the west, where Asbury’s family had spent a few years prior to and during the Civil War.

The single Buncombe (Asheville) entry is Asbury, whom the manuscript census page shows as boarding with the Sims family: John (b. May 1855), Caroline Q (b. Feb. 1849) and their two young daughters Corra C, (b. Jan. 1883) and Addie E. (b. Oct. 1888).

Having encountered that family name earlier in some census schedules, I wondered, who are these particular Simses, and what importance did that have, if any?  Cross-checking in the Whisnant Surname Center, Asbury‘s mother was Eliza Minerva Sims (b. 1844 in Rutherford County; ms. census page says 1845).  Unfortunately the Surname Center offers nothing on her parents (hence on her siblings).

Fortunately, the 1860 Rutherford County census shows one Sims family, living in the Golden Valley township community of Whiteside. Moreover, Asbury’s father Pinkney’s brother Eli, also in the Whiteside enumeration, lived between two Sims families: James (b. 1832), who had a son John, born in 1855 (same as the Asheville John Sims); and Hampton (b. 1805), who had a daughter Eliza, born in 1845 (same as Asbury’s mother Eliza, whose father is also listed on the Whisnant Surname Center as Hampton Sims).  Further (at least circumstantial) evidence of the family connection is that in the 1880 Rutherford County census, a Nancy Sims is listed next door to Pinkney Whisnant.  Hence it seems clear that Asbury’s mother Eliza and Hampton Sims’s son John were cousins.

It seems acceptably clear, then, that in the time-honored stem- (or chain-, or serial-) family migration pattern, Asbury chose Asheville at least partly because his aunt and uncle were already established there (John was a night watchman), and he could board with them temporarily until he could find a job and his own place to live.

More confirmation may be possible, but I am satisfied: “Mama, I’m moving to Asheville.  Had a letter from Uncle John and Aunt Carolina saying I could stay with them until I get a job.”  Whatever factors were involved, and to whatever relative degrees, Asbury’s choice to go to Asheville appears to have been comfortably over-determined.  No other place offered such a persuasive array of pull factors.

His exact arrival date in Asheville is unknown, but by the time of the 1900 census (June) and the publication of the 1900 Asheville city directory, he was boarding at 281 S. Main Street, also listed as the Simses’ residence.  John and Caroline and their daughters had probably arrived fairly recently, since they are not listed in the 1890 directory.

Horsecars and Electric Streetcars: A Wave in the 1880s

The job Asbury found (after perhaps a short while working as a barkeep, or bar helper) was as a conductor with the Asheville Street Railway, whose settled-sounding name belied the turbulence of its then brief history.

According to Wikipedia‘s very useful “Streetcars in North America” entry, some U.S. cities had single horsecars by the 1820s, and organized car lines followed a decade later

Editorial cartoon from New Orleans, advocating the switch from horsecars to electric streetcars, October 21, 1893. Wikipedia.

Editorial cartoon from New Orleans, advocating the switch from horsecars to electric streetcars, October 21, 1893. Wikipedia.

(eventually including one in Boston that used 8,000 horses).  The first electric car appeared in 1882, and electric streetcar lines multiplied in the mid- and late 1880s as horsecar lines faded away.

The system that set worldwide standards was Virginia’s Richmond Union Passenger Railway (UPR).  It opened with ten cars on February 2, 1888 and increased to 100 cars by mid-summer.  By 1895, there were some 900 lines in the U.S., and 11,000 miles of track.

Walter R. Turner has outlined the early spread of streetcar systems in North Carolina.  Authorized by the General Assembly in 1881, systems did not begin to operate until Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte and Wilmington got horsecar systems between 1886 and 1888.

As Bailey, Canfield and Cox’s Trolleys in the Land of the Sky tells the story of Asheville’s experience, after an officer of the Asheville Street Railway (ASR) went to Richmond to see the UPR, the Asheville group signed a contract with its builder.  If the story of the next decade of the system’s development were couched as a street railway ride, it would subject the rider/reader to a series of short hops on rudimentary lines, under unpredictable ownership and management, over ever-shifting routes, and abrupt fits and starts on uncomfortable (frequently open) cars.

An 1890 photograph of Asheville’s Court Square  juxtaposes horse-drawn wagons and one of the city’s first electric streetcars.

Court Square, 1890. Pack Memorial Public Library.

Court Square, 1890. Pack Memorial Public Library.

Streetcars on Square at N. Main Street (later Lexington Avenue), 1890. Pack Memorial Public Library

Streetcars on Square at N. Main Street (later Lexington Avenue), 1890. Photo by Lindsey’s Photographic Parlor.  Pack Memorial Public Library photo collection.  N. Main St. runs down the hill behind streetcars.

It took more than a decade, Bailey, Canfield and Cox show, for the system to settle into a stable configuration, and even that involved various unfulfilled plans, charter

Asheville city directory, 1900.

Asheville city directory, 1900.

manipulations, threats from competing lines, lines proposed and authorized (or not) but not built, bankruptcies and receiverships.

Washington Post, January 7, 1895, p. 7. Proquest.com

Washington Post, January 7, 1895, p. 7. Proquest.com

In one rather sensational episode in January 1895, the whole system–“lock, stock, and barrel,” as local vernacular might have cast it: six or seven miles of track, ten cars, and associated facilities–was acquired from unnamed “New York capitalists” by the local pair Charles A. Moore and J. G. Martin at a sheriff’s sale for the sum of $900 “to settle an old judgment.”

Trolleys in the Land of the Sky contains a useful map of Asheville’s web of four interconnected short lines in operation during the system’s first decade.  Click here or on map to see a larger, more readable image:

Asheville Street Railways, 1889-1900. Trolleys in the Land of the Sky. Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway is at upper left. Click on image for larger version.

Asbury Goes to Work as an Asheville Street Railway Conductor, March 1900

The important thing for Asbury and other early employees was that there were jobs to be had, and in March 1900, he got one of them.

Six days a week before daybreak, he left the room he rented from his aunt and uncle at 281 S. Main Street and walked several blocks to the “carbarn” on the lower end of Valley Street.  From there he took his 22-passenger streetcar out on the tracks.  There was no center aisle, so the conductor walked along the outside running board to collect fares and punch transfers while the motorman tended to the handbrakes.  Quitting time was 3:00 p.m.

SanbornMap_Asheville_CarBarn_Page_11_download_cropped_small

Streetcar shed (“carbarn”) on lower Valley Street, 1901. NC Maps, North Carolina Collection, UNC Chapel Hill. Click for enlargeable view of page 11, and entire Sanborn map.

Interactive Google Earth Map with Sanborn and other links. Click to go to interactive version.

Interactive Google Earth Map with Sanborn and other links. Click to go to interactive version.

So from the conductor’s platform, what did Asheville look like in 1900?  If you enjoy tinkering with Google Earth, an interactive overview of Asheville, circa 1890, is available by clicking the small image at right.  It will take you to an interactive map offering both historic and current details and perspectives.

The major junction in Asheville in 1900 (as it had been since the days of Indian paths and the drovers’ road) was Court (later Pack) Square.

Court Square (called Pack Square here, though it did not carry that name until the 1920s). Streetcar tracks in foreground. Pack Memorial Public Library.

Pack Square with streetcar tracks in foreground. Old Court House (1892) at back center. Pack Memorial Public Library at R. Zebulon B. Vance monument (completed 1896.)

Fairly close to the Square, on S. Main Street (later Biltmore Avenue; leading down from the right in the image above), a very early streetcar looked like the image below.

Streetcar on track, S. Main Street, 1889. Pack Memorial Public Library.

Streetcar on track, S. Main Street, 1889. Pack Memorial Public Library.

From the balcony of the Swannanoa Hotel, one would have seen the view below:

Streetcar on S. Main Street, from balcony of Swannanoa Hotel. Pack Memorial Public Library

View of Main St S toward the Square, from an upstairs balcony of the Swannanoa Hotel. Barber pole at right in front of the Eagle Hotel. White Man’s Bar on the right. Stepping stones across the dirt street. Streetcars, wagons, and horseback riders in the street. On the left: Library, the Bonanza saloon, and C.S. Cooper stoves and tinware. Image and text from Pack Memorial Public Library.

And if  about six or so  years later you had gone to the Square, at the top of the hill behind the streetcar and turned left on Patton Avenue, you would have encountered something like the scene below:

View up Patton Ave from Haywood St toward the square. Courthouse (1876) with bell tower in background. Paragon Bldg at left, on the corner. Black man driving a wagon sitting in front of the dentist's office. Street car tracks in the unpaved street. Drhumor Bldg built 1895 on right. Estimated date 1895-1898. From T. H. Lindsey, Scenes of Western North Carolina. Pack Memorial Public Library

View up Patton Ave from Haywood St toward the square. Courthouse (1876) with bell tower in background. Paragon Bldg at left, on the corner. Black man driving a wagon sitting in front of the dentist’s office. Street car tracks in the unpaved street. Drhumor Bldg built 1895 on right. Estimated date 1895-1898. From T. H. Lindsey, Scenes of Western North Carolina. Pack Memorial Public Library

Sometime around 1900 (dates of construction vary), the Southern Railway built a splendid station on Depot Street, in use for decades thereafter:

Southern Railway Depot on Depot Street, ca. 1900. Barbour Postcard Collection, UNC Library.

Southern Railway Depot on Depot Street, ca. 1900. Barbour Postcard Collection, UNC Library.

Probably about 1905, Asbury and fellow conductor (or motorman?) Henry Thompson had their picture taken in front of the Depot:

Pack Memorial Public Library. Image enhancement by Evan Whisnant.

Pack Memorial Public Library. Image enhancement by Evan Whisnant.  Click photograph for larger image.

Streetcar passengers willing to venture farther from town could take a car to Lookout Park (left center on the street railway map above) or Riverside Park (toward lower left on the map).  Trolleys in the Land of the Sky chronicles the attractions: Lookout Park (closed in 1902) offered vaudeville performances, acrobats and clowns, and musical performances.  Riverside had canoes, horse shows and races, a casino, and movies on a screen situated in the lake.

Lake in Riverside Park. Postcard by Hackney & Moale, Asheville NC. Collection of David E. Whisnant.

Lake in Riverside Park, with movie screen on island, center left. Note streaming smoke from passing train at right.. Postcard by Hackney & Moale Co., Asheville NC. Collection of David E. Whisnant.

An Asheville Citizen advertisement for Riverside’s July 4th celebration in 1915 dramatizes its attractions:

Asheville Citizen, July 4, 1915. Via Jon Elliston, Asheville 1915.

Asheville Citizen, July 4, 1915. Via Jon Elliston, Asheville 1915.

Unfortunately, the park washed away in the July 16, 1916 flood.

Asbury’s Bachelor Years in Asheville

Somewhere around 1904 or 1905, the Asheville Street Railway gathered its officers and employees for a group picture in front of four streetcars.  Among them were Asbury (framed by the window in the second car from the left) and his brother Charlie (listed but not locatable in photo):

Asheville Street Railway officers and employees, ca. 1907

Asheville Street Railway officers and employees, ca. 1904-1906. Asbury is framed in RH window of 2nd car from L; his brother Charlie is listed as among those on the 3rd row, but is not locatable.

Except that he was a steady employee and capable conductor on the Asheville Street Railway, not much has come to light about Asbury’s time in Asheville before he took the train down the mountain to Morganton and married Sarah Ella Austin at the State Hospital in November 1907.

For about five years, Asheville city directories confirm, he boarded with his aunt and uncle Sims–first at 281 S. Main Street and then at 37 N. French Broad Avenue.  Sometime around 1903, his younger brother Charlie also got a job as a conductor and joined him.  But Asbury was not listed in the 1906-07 directory, and his uncle John Sims had remarried and moved to 144 S. French Broad.

A few scattered newspaper notices suggest that Asbury maintained his relationship with Sarah Ella during his bachelor years. On August 14, 1900 the Asheville Daily Gazette reported  that he had “returned from Morganton yesterday,” and in mid-July 1902 the Morganton Herald’s “Hospital Notes” column said that former employee Asbury Whisnant “visited old friends here Friday.”  Whether he also had other “lady friends” in Asheville (as he called them during the dozen or so years he lived after Ella died) is unknown.

Having chronicled Asbury’s seven bachelor years in Asheville as best the sources available to me allow, I am left with other questions: Could anything else be said about his years of boarding with the Sims family and their daughters?  How much time did he have to visit family and friends in Rutherford (especially Golden Valley and the Whiteside community), McDowell, Caldwell (where Lenoir was) and Burke  (where Morganton was) counties?  Did his Rutherford County family ever visit him in Asheville?  Did he have a social circle in Asheville that extended beyond his workmates and their families?  Was he involved in the streetcar workers’ union (as I know he was later, and will come back to in due time)?

19130429StrikeArticleAtlantaConst_Headline

Atlanta Constitution, April 29, 1913.

My next post on Asbury and Ella will focus on their first decade and a half together in Asheville–from their marriage in 1907 until their purchase of their own home and move to West Asheville in February 1923.  The dynamics of their life as a couple and a family (a stillborn child, another who lived less than a year, and then three others–all within five years), and circumstances and events in Asheville (e.g., the growth of West Asheville’s suburbs, the streetcar workers’ strike of

Flooded streetcar barn at Riverside Park, July 1916. Pack Memorial Public Library.

Flooded streetcar barn at Riverside Park carbarn, July 1916. Pack Memorial Public Library.

1913, the great flood of 1916, the worldwide influenza epidemic of 1918 (in which Asbury and Ella almost lost their youngest child) combined to present stability and some modest rewards,  but also personal and social challenges and losses.

So one additional post–focusing retrospectively upon city and regional developments and dynamics, needs to intervene before we return to Asbury and Ella.

Retrospective: Larger Dynamics, 1860-1900

I opened this current post with a statement (and some images) about Asheville as “a burgeoning node of modernity” when Asbury arrived in 1900–as indeed it was.  But the route the city had to traverse in order to get there was neither brief nor easy.  Indeed, for Christian Reid to dub Asheville “the Land of the Sky” in 1875 (see previous posts) was at best premature. In the sky, certainly, but hardly of it.

Yes, in 1875 Asheville already had (indeed, had had for a half-century) some stylish hotels where dinnertime pianists played Chopin and impeccably attired African American staff served guests their food, cleaned their rooms and clothes, and (presumably) deferred in a comforting “befoh de wah” way.  Carriages for hire conveyed low-country visitors to breathtaking promontories and views nearby, but public infrastructure was rudimentary at best: streets were rutted and dirty, reliable water supply still far off, and sewage was dumped wherever it could be, regardless.  And the first electric streetcar was not to roll for more than a dozen years.

So whatever is to be said about Asheville’s 1900 modernity, it had emerged uncertainly and unevenly through forty years of turmoil, and in all honesty that modernity had to be called unstable and inequitable.  However distant the lowland plantations, slavery in western North Carolina, Buncombe County, and Asheville had been pervasive and brutal. However far away its major battles, the Civil War had wreaked havoc upon families and communities.   As everywhere, Reconstruction was a jumbled mess. And closing the gap between a pie-in-the-Land-of-the-Sky fantasy and an even marginally modern city would require thoroughgoing infrastructural development.

To these modernizing challenges and processes I turn in my next post.  Afterwards we will return to Asbury and Ella themselves.

References

“Asbury Whisnant: Man 38 Years in Transport Service Here,” unidentified Asheville newspaper clipping, September 25, 1938; Asheville city directories (1883-1930); Foster A. Sondley, Asheville and Buncombe County (1922);  William S. Powell, “Karl Von Ruck,” NCpedia; Walter R. Turner, “Development of Streetcar Systems in North Carolina

This entry was posted in Asheville history, Blacks in Asheville, Whisnant family and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *